Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Canon 10-18mm’

Age is a relative thing. I chuckled a little yesterday when I read a sign next to this spectacular Gingko tree (Gingko biloba) that characterized it as a “young man,” despite the fact that it was planted in 1895. Putting aside the fact that there are male gingko trees and female gingko trees, a concept that blows my mind, gingko trees, which originated in China, can live to be 1200 years old and are “potentially immortal.”

I spotted this tree while visiting the Jardin des Serres d’Auteil. This botanical garden, located near the Bois de Boulogne on the edge of Paris, dates back to 1761 and has an immense complex of different greenhouses, some with groupings based on botanical species and some geographically based. I was particularly struck by the ones ones focused on the Sahara desert and one focused on tropical South America. In the latter case, I had to keep wiping off the lens of my camera, because it was fogging up in the steaming heat of the greenhouse. Unfortunately, some of the greenhouses with the most spectacular plants were only open when gardeners were physically present, so I was not able, for example, to see their collection of orchids.

The leaves of the gingko tree were mostly faded and fallen this late in the year, but I still  marveled at the size of the tree and the golden carpet that surrounded it. A sign noted that in 2011 this tree was 82 feet (25 meters) in height and its trunk had a circumference of 13 feet (395 cm).

I think that this gingko tree was the only one of its species at the garden. Somehow I felt like a personal ad, “Young male gingko tree in Paris seeks companion.” I wonder if there is a special category for its type on dating apps.Gingko tree in Paris

Gingko tree in Paris

Gingko tree in Paris

© Michael Q. Powell. All rights reserved.

Read Full Post »

During my three-week vacation in Paris, I am staying in a small studio apartment that I rented through Airbnb. It is located on the top floor of an old building on Rue Montorgueil, a pedestrian zone in the center of the city that is lined with shops and restaurants.

One of the apartment’s wonderful features is that it has a balcony overlooking the street. Although I have had to bundle up a bit in the cool November weather, I love spending as much time as I can sitting outside, observing the people below. The first shot shows one of my first dinners here. I don’t usually photograph my food, but this image gives you a sense of the balcony setting as well as a look at some of my basic food groups here.

The second shot gives you an idea of the view from the balcony. Yes, it is a long way down, but it is literally not for the faint of heart, because you have to walk up 96 stairs in a narrow winding stairway in order to get this view.

The final photo shows one small set of the stairs I have to climb. On each of the six floors, there is a small landing and one apartment to the left and one to the right.

dinner in Paris

Paris balcony view

Paris apartment stairs

© Michael Q. Powell. All rights reserved.

Read Full Post »

After I did the posting called Sunrise on the Seine earlier today, I realized that it did not truly give readers a sense of location. Yes, it was in Paris, and yes, it was on the Seine River. The image was pretty, but it didn’t really speak “Paris.”

I shot a lot of photos this morning as I walked and stopped on the paved pathway down near the water level of the river. I was hoping to be able to capture an image of Notre Dame at sunrise. The angles and timing did not quite work out as I expected. By the time Notre Dame came into view, the sun had already risen a little too high and was directly in front of me.

When sorting through my photos, I initially rejected this image because the bright sun created a hot spot in the image. Later today, I decided to revisit the image and decided I liked it. Why? It has Notre Dame in the frame, of course, but it also shows the effects of the early morning sun as the rays illuminate the boat on the right and the concrete barrier along the pathway.

So, I decided to break my normal pattern and post multiple images today. It’s Paris, after all—I am sure I will be forgiven if I feel extra inspired here.

 

Notre Dame at sunrise

© Michael Q. Powell. All rights reserved.

Read Full Post »

Saturday morning sunrise on the Seine River. What a great way to start today in Paris.

Sunrise on the Seine

© Michael Q. Powell. All rights reserved.

Read Full Post »

Yesterday, on the day of my arrival in Paris, I felt drawn to visit Notre Dame de Paris, anxious to assess its current condition. There was a lot of worldwide press on the fire in April 2019, but since that time Notre Dame has  disappeared from the headlines, at least in the United States.

My first view of the cathedral was of the towers, which appear to be relatively intact. From that angle, as shown in the second photo, I had no idea of the extent of the damage the fire had caused.

When I crossed to the bank of the Seine River and walked down to the water level, I could clearly see the massive devastation. There is scaffolding supporting part of the structure and tarps covering other areas. This is a familiar angle for me, and I distinctively sense and feel the loss of the roof and the spire that are no longer present.

I am sure that I will photograph Notre Dame multiple times during this stay in Paris, but it seems appropriate to share these photos today, as I compose my first post from this beautiful city.

If you have not seen my photos of Notre Dame de Paris in 2011 that were featured in my last post, Temporary change of venue, check it out and you can do your own comparisons.

Notre Dame de Paris

Notre Dame de Paris

 

© Michael Q. Powell. All rights reserved.

 

Read Full Post »